Research in the Pipeline: Idioms Most Used….. Research Seminar 24 April 2017

APRIL  RESEARCH SEMINAR
ALL WELCOME
11:30AM-12:00PM 24 APRIL 2017
LEVEL 8, NEXUS BUILDING, 10 PULTENEY STREET, SMaRTe ROOM, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

RESEARCH IN THE PIPELINE: IDENTIFYING THE IDIOMS MOST FREQUENTLY USED IN ENGLISH ACADEMIC WRITING.

Dr JULIA MILLER

ABSTRACT: The definition of the term ‘idiom’ is hotly debated, but for the purposes of this presentation it will be taken to refer to a multiword expression whose meaning is primarily figurative. There is a widespread belief that idioms are little used in academic discourse, particularly in writing. Research indicates, however, that this is not the case. Idioms such as in the pipeline occur in 536 articles and books in the Springer Exemplar corpus (or body of texts).

This presentation will explore preliminary findings based on an analysis of the British Academic English Spoken Corpus (BASE) and the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE), cross-checked with articles in Springer Exemplar, to identify which idioms are used most often in English academic speaking and writing.

The most frequently used idioms can then be taught to and used by university students with English as an additional language, allowing them greater entry into the academic community.

BIOGRAPHY: Julia Miller has a PhD in pedagogical lexicography and works in the area of academic skills and English as an Additional Language. She has created the English for Uni website: as a means to make grammar teaching and learning more interesting, and draws on intercultural aspects to make her materials appropriate to a wide range of learners.

She is the President of the Australasian lexicography society Australex and a keynote speaker at this year’s Asialex conference.

Dr Julia Miller: Researcher Profile and Contact Details to find out more about Dr Millers research and affiliations.

 

 

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