Platter of cheese and crackers

For our October seminar, the Food Values Research Group is pleased to present:

Mens’ Cookbooks in the 20th Century

Dr Gerry Groot, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Studies, Department of Asian Studies, University of Adelaide

Dr Gerry GrootThis presentation discusses the ways that men’s cookbooks in English have been treated in the academic literature to-date, and by noting the trends and themes reflected in them, goes far in refuting the implications that they were about confining women to the household or imposing stereotypes. Clearly male chauvinist cookbooks are a recent phenomenon, while entreaties to men to help reduce the burdens on wives, or calls to develop culinary skills to seduce women, were the main impetus.

Gerry Groot normally teaches, researches and writes on Chinese politics particularly united front work, social change, soft power and Asian influences on the world both past and present. However, exposure to the Masters in Gastronomy course at the University of Adelaide prompted him to also become active as a collector of Chinese cookbooks and related materials. During the course of his searches, he noticed some cookbooks aimed at men, and began collecting these also. Inspired, or upset about some writings about some of his collected titles, Gerry began analysing these men’s cookbooks to determine the way gender was used. His 500 or so Chinese cookbooks, remain languishing on the shelf.

When: Tuesday, 3rd of October, 1-2 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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For the Food Values Research Group’s September seminar, we present a double header featuring the work of two of our advanced postgraduate students. Each talk takes a very different approach to studying values around meat consumption.

Where are the women? Intersectionality as a tool to make peace with my inner feminist when talking about meat, cultural difference and animals

Ms Yvette Wijnandts, PhD Candidate, School of Humanities, University of Adelaide

Yvette Wijnandts pic“Intersectionality” is, at its core, a feminist concept. First used by feminist and critical race scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw (1989; 1991), it described the precarious position of black women in the American legal system. Quickly, it became a buzzword within feminist theory and now the popularity of the concept amongst all ranges of the social sciences and humanities has, arguably, alienated it from feminism all together. To a certain extent, the same has happened to my research. Identifying myself first and foremost as a feminist scholar, often I cannot help but wonder whether this is justifiable when my research focusses on cultural difference and animals, but not on women. As a feminist scholar, the disappearance of women from feminist theories and concepts seems like reason for panic but during this presentation I aim to make a convincing argument that moving beyond women can be an act of feminism too.

This paper presents my search towards the meaning and value of the concept of “intersectionality” in my research towards the intersection of cultural and species difference in discourses surrounding practices of eating animals. In the Netherlands, it is illegal to slaughter animals without sedating first, except when this is required for religious diets. Yet, since 2012 this exception became scrutinised in Dutch politics, leading to large public debates about this matter. Whereas previous research has looked at intersections between sexual and racial difference and meat (i.e. Adams, 2015; Singer, 1975), this has been done from a more moralistic perspective than I aim to do. Instead, I use intersectionality to examine the power relations that influence how species and cultural identities become constructed in debates that supposedly only discuss animal rights. More specifically, looking at un-sedated religious slaughtering, I aim to examine how the Islamic and Jewish population were represented in different manners during these discourses, while the exception in the law affected both groups similarly.

Yvette Wijnandts has a background in gender and ethnicity studies. For her PhD research at the University of Adelaide, she uses postcolonial theory and critical feminist theory on ethics to gain a deeper understanding of the discourses surrounding animals in the food industry. She aims to show how different structures of power intersect, specifically that of culture and religion, with the issue of animal rights in a globalizing world.

Australian meat consumers and their concerns about sheep and beef cattle transportation and slaughter

Ms Emily Buddle, PhD Candidate, School of Humanities, University of Adelaide

Emily BuddleMeat consumers are increasingly interested in livestock production practices. There is tension between the desire to consume meat and wanting to make ‘ethical’ food choices. In 2015 and 2016, sixty-six meat consumers from Australia participated in focus groups and interviews, structured around topics such as on-farm welfare and meat purchasing decisions. While exploring how Australian meat consumers conceptualise animal welfare, the transportation and slaughter of sheep and beef cattle were highlighted as key areas of concern, including road transport and shipping conditions related to live export.

Emily Buddle is a PhD candidate within the Food Values Research Group and the University of Adelaide. Her project is part of the ARC Linkage Project “Getting to the meat of the matter”. She has been exploring the attitudes of Australian meat consumers about animal welfare in the sheep and beef cattle industries. Emily has enjoyed coupling her passion for Australian agriculture with developing new skills in social science methodologies during her PhD and wishes to continue in a similar space post-PhD.

When: Tuesday, 5th of September, 1-2 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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Rachel Ankeny on the Knowing Animals podcastProf. Rachel Ankeny recently joined the Knowing Animals podcast to discuss buying free range eggs. The episode focused on her journal article co-authored with Heather Bray. The article is titled ‘Happy Chickens Lay Tastier Eggs: Motivations for Buying Free-range Eggs in Australia’. It was published in the journal Anthrozoos in May 2017.

This episode of Knowing Animals is brought to you by the Australasian Animal Studies Association. Find them online here: http://animalstudies.org.au.

 

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For our August seminar, the Food Values Research Group is pleased to present: Exploring agrobiodiversity to generate resilience Dr Douglas Bardsley, Senior Lecturer, Geography, Environment & Population, University of Adelaide Diversity within systems provides opportunities for complex adaptative responses to external drivers of change. That is true for agricultural systems where farmers and their associated […]

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We are constantly receiving information on nutrition and food from scientists, government, media, marketers, and our friends and family. But still many of us make poor dietary decisions and fall for diet trends like Paleo, gluten free or superfoods. Does this onslaught of nutrition information (mis)inform our dietary practices? Food Values researcher Dr Jessica Loyer explored […]

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Food Values Research Group convener Professor Rachel Ankeny recently presented a keynote address on animal welfare and consumer attitudes at the Animal Intersections conference (3-5 July) at the University of Adelaide. Her keynote address, “Exploring the Intersections of Consumer and Citizen Attitudes toward Animal Welfare,” discussed the notion of “food citizenship” as a valuable approach to public […]

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For our July seminar, the Food Values Research Group is pleased to present: Reading (Not-)Eating in the works of Emily and Charlotte Brontë Ms Sarah Pearce, Doctoral Candidate in English, Flinders University This seminar offers a contemporary feminist reading of the cluster of themes surrounding consumption and food in Jane Eyre (1847) and Villette (1853) by […]

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For our June seminar, the Food Values Research Group is pleased to present: Do Healthy Diets Differ in Their Sensory Characteristics? Dr David Cox, Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences The relationship between sensory characteristics of foods, healthy diets and weight status is not well established (Cox et al, 2016); however, knowledge could […]

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Dr Susie Chant, a recent Food Values Research Group Phd graduate, was involved in the South Australian local foods phenomenon long before she decided to research and write about the topic. She ran several award-winning restaurants before earning a Dean’s Commendation for Doctoral Thesis Excellence for her dissertation, A History of Local Foods in Australia 1788 – […]

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For our May seminar, the Food Values Research Group is pleased to present: Mindless Meat Eating: The Role of Cognitive Dissonance and Negative Emotions in the Consumption of Animals Dr Carolyn Semmler, Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology, University of Adelaide We consume animals and yet also state that we love, respect and care for them. […]

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