Psychology

Presented by Associate Professor Kleanthes K. Grohmann, University of Cyprus & Cyprus Acquisition Team

Date: Thursday 10 November 2016

Time: 1-2pm

Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes building, North Terrace Campus

No RSVP required, all welcome!

Abstract: Universal Grammar (UG) denotes the species-specific faculty of language, presumed to be invariant across individuals. Over the years, it has shrunk from a full-blown set of principles and parameters to a much smaller set of properties, possibly as small as just containing the linguistic structure-building operation Merge, which in turn derives the uniquely human language property of recursion (Hauser et al., 2002). UG qua human faculty of language is further assumed to constitute the “optimal solution to minimal design specifications” (Chomsky, 2001: 1), a perfect system for language. Unfortunately, the human system or physiology does not always run perfectly smooth in an optimal fashion. There are malfunctions, misformations, and other aberrations throughout. The language system is no exception. The first part of this talk will build on Tsimpli et al. (in press) and present language pathology from the perspective of the underlying system: What can non-intact language tell us about UG? Particular emphasis will be put on evidence from Greek, and how the investigation of impaired (cognitive-) linguistic abilities from one language can inform the study at large — and how it can (not) shed light on the study of (an impaired) language faculty. The parentheses just employed may give an indication to the kinds of questions (and answers?) to be expected. If time permits, the presentation will continue showcasing some approaches to tackle these questions from research carried out by the Cyprus Acquisition Team. And, pushing the time constraints further, I finally will pick up a suggestion from Leivada (2015) and develop the Locus Preservation Hypothesis in joint work with Maria Kambanaros and Evelina Leivada, mainly from the perspective of impaired child Greek.

Speaker: Kleanthes K. Grohmann is Professor of Biolinguistics in the Department of English Studies at the University of Cyprus (UCY) and the Director of CAT, the Cyprus Acquisition Team (CAT Lab). He received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland (2000) and has published widely in the areas of syntactic theory, comparative syntax, language acquisition, impaired language, and multilingualism. Among the books he has written and (co-)edited are Understanding Minimalism (with N. Hornstein and J. Nunes, 2005, CUP), InterPhases (2009, OUP), and The Cambridge Handbook of Biolinguistics (with Cedric Boeckx, 2013, CUP). He is founding co-editor of the John Benjamins book series Language Faculty and Beyond and editor of the open-access journal Biolinguistics.

Homepage: http://www.kleanthes.biolinguistics.eu; Email: kleanthi@ucy.ac.cy

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Presented by Professor Deborah Turnbull, School of Psychology, University of Adelaide

Date: Thursday 20 October 2016

Time: 1-2pm

Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus

No RSVP required, all welcome!

Abstract: This talk will address the behavioural aspects of cancer control, which Professor Turnbull has been researching since the latest 1980s. Her most recent research, which she will discuss here, investigates practical and scalable methods to improve uptake for bowel cancer screening. This NHMRC funded work has been influential in informing the design of the invitational process for the national screening program.

Speaker: Professor Turnbull has just finished her second term as a member of the Competitive Grants Review Committee of the NSW Cancer Institute and has served as the Chair of the Research Advisory Board of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute. She is a regular reviewer for the Canadian Institutes of Health. She is also a committed teacher and contributes across the psychology curriculum in the areas of research methods, health psychology, and cross-cultural psychology.

Seminar Poster 20 Oct 2016

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Comments Off on Research Seminar Series | Improving uptake of bowel cancer screening amongst Australian men: A national randomized controlled trial | Thursday 20 October 2016

Presented by Dr Clemence Due University of Adelaide

Date: Thursday 29 September 2016

Time: 1-2pm

Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus

No RSVP required, all welcome!

Abstract: Australia has long held a policy of detaining people in immigration detention if they arriving seeking asylum – typically for those who arrive by boat. In recent months, there have been suggestions that this policy should be replicated elsewhere in the world as the numbers of people seeking asylum increase into the tens of millions. While a small body of research has highlighted the negative impact of immigration detention on the health and wellbeing of asylum seekers, more research is required in order to ensure that the wellbeing of those seeking asylum is considered in any policy proposed by governments around the world. As such, this paper reports on data collected through a variety of research projects that have explored the health and wellbeing of both adults and children with refugee backgrounds who initially spent time in detention prior to being settled in Australia. The results of the study confirm those of all previous literature in this area, finding that immigration detention leads to negative outcomes on health and wellbeing that continue several years after release – particularly for those who only receive temporary visas. As such, the paper concludes by considering how service providers and others can best work with people who have spent time in detention to reduce harmful outcomes, as well as potential ways forward for policy.

 Speaker: Dr Due is a Senior Lecturer here in the School of Psychology at the University of Adelaide. Her diverse research areas are linked by concerns about the health and well-being of individuals and families who are considered to be marginalized or vulnerable. This includes adults and children with refugee or migrant backgrounds, children with developmental disorders, gender and sexuality diverse children and their parents, and people who have experienced pregnancy loss. Her research areas also include racism and prejudice, psychology education, and lifespan development. In 2016 she was awarded the Vice Chancellor’s Award for Women’s Excellence in Research as an Early Career Researcher.

 

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Presented by Professor Susan Petrilli, Dept of Human Sciences, Languages & Arts, University of Bari (Italy) Date: Thursday 22 September 2016 Time: 1-2pm Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus No RSVP required, all welcome! Abstract: This talk examines the problem of subjectivity from a semiotic perspective, as a sign phenomenon. Reference […]

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Presented by Dr Mark Mackay and Dr Josephine Varney, School of Medicine, Flinders University Date: Thursday 8 September 2016 Time: 1-2pm Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus No RSVP required, all welcome! Abstract: In this talk, we discuss how we use decision making in modelling our complex system – health care. […]

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Thursday 11 August 2016 – 1 – 2 pm Room 526 Hughes Building Presented by Professor Cecilia A Essau University of Roehampton, United Kingdom Abstract: Up to 25% of those below 18 years of age are affected by emotional and behavioural problems which cause significant distress and impairment in major life domains. Most existing intervention […]

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Friday, July 15th, 3pm, Hughes Building Room 323 Presented by Professor Wesley Wildman Abstract: The Simulating Religion Project (SRP) is a cluster of subprojects within the Institute for the Bio-Cultural Study of Religion aiming to apply modeling and simulation techniques to the scientific study of religion. Computer modeling and simulation depends on data, so building and finding […]

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How to write a review for publication_ July112016 Presented by Dr Rachel Roberts and Dr Diana Dorstyn, School of Psychology, University of Adelaide Date: Monday 11 July 2016 Time: 1-2pm Location: Room 323, Level 3 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus No RSVP required, all welcome! Abstract: Systematic reviews and meta-analyses provide a straightforward process for […]

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Presented by Associate Professor Maureen Ashe, University of British Columbia Date: Thursday 23 June 2016 Time: 1-2pm Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus No RSVP required, all welcome! Speaker: Dr. Maureen Ashe is Associate Professor in the UBC Department of Family Practice, investigator at the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, physiotherapist, and […]

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Comments Off on Research Seminar Series | Development of a Lifestyle Intervention for Women at Retirement: Translating evidence into action| Thursday 23 June 2016

Presented by Professor Philip Gerrans, School of Philosophy, University of Adelaide Date: Thursday 9 June 2016 Time: 1-2pm* *Please note – the time of this event was incorrectly advertised in the Executive Dean’s News this week. 1 – 2pm is the correct time* Location: Room 526, Level 5 Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus No RSVP […]

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Comments Off on Research Seminar Series | Pain asymbolia, depersonalization and the sense of self: A processing account | Thursday 9 June 2016