In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Adam Webster, explains the difference between a double-dissolution election and an ‘ordinary’ election. Click here to read Adam’s article.

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By Dr Judith Bannister, Deputy Director of Public Law and Policy Research Unit With reforms to Australian Commonwealth freedom of information (FOI) still stalled in the Senate[1] it is interesting to see how FOI is faring in the United Kingdom (UK). While the future of the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) remains in […]

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In an article published in The Age, Dr Joanna Howe argues that a visa that allows international companies to employ foreign crews for $3 an hour will decimate the Australian shipping industry. “With our car plants closing down and manufacturing jobs going offshore, we are increasingly accustomed to jobs being lost overseas. What is new […]

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In an article on The Conversation, Dr Joanna Howe, examines the assertion made by Federal Minister for Employment and Women, Michaelia Cash, made on the ABC’s Q&A program that foreign seafarers are paid $2 an hour under legislation introduced by the Labor Party in 2012. Is the Minister’s claim correct? Click here to read Joanna’s analysis and […]

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The Public Law and Policy Research Unit (in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Administrative Law (SA Chapter)) invites you to attend: Reasoned Administration and Democratic Legitimacy Professor Jerry Mashaw Sterling Professor Emeritus of Law, Yale University Professor Jerry Mashaw is Sterling Professor of Law Emeritus and Professorial Lecturer at Yale University, where he teaches […]

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In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Adam Webster (with Gabrielle Appleby of UNSW) explains how cycling law reform must balance the rights of cyclists with the rights of other road users. Click here to read Adam’s article.  

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Professor Amanda Nettlebeck (with co-authors Russell Smandych, Louis A. Knafla, and Robert Foster) has recently had a new book published by UBC Press – Fragile Settlements: Aboriginal Peoples, Law, and Resistance in South-West Australia and Prairie Canada. Fragile Settlements compares the processes by which colonial authority was asserted over Indigenous people in south-west Australia and […]

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On the AUSPUBLAW blog, Associate Professor Matthew Stubbs examines whether 2016 will be the year of ‘substantive’ progress on constitutional recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Click here to read Matthew’s post.

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In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Adam Webster examines some of the problems associated with the proposed plebiscite on same-sex marriage. Click here to read Adam’s article.

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In this post Associate Professor John Gava examines the question: should we ever strip any Australian citizen of their citizenship? The discussion around the Federal government’s desire to strip certain Australians of their Australian citizenship has concentrated on means – how this can be done – but not ends – should we even be thinking […]

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