Research Success Stories

SA Scientist of the Year

Congratulations to Professor James Paton who was recently announced as the 2017 SA Scientist of the Year. Congratulations also go to Dr Laura Weyrich, the 2017 Tall Poppy award winner. For more information on their research and other award winners please see: https://statedevelopment.sa.gov.au/science/sa-science-excellence-awards/2017-winners

Other Tall Poppy Awards

Other Tall Poppy awards were given to Dr Zoe Doubleday – congratulations.

http://www.aips.net.au/tall-poppies/sa-tall-poppies/past-sa-tall-poppy-winners/2017-south-australian-award-winners/

ARC Future Fellowships

Congratulations to Dr Bastian Llamas and Dr Christopher McDevitt who were successful with ARC Future Fellowship applications. Their project descriptions are given below.

Dr Bastian Llamas

This project aims to use the power of High Throughput Sequencing to investigate a range of genetic mechanisms that facilitate rapid human adaptation to diverse environments. This project expects to create the first ultra-high-quality Aboriginal Australian reference genome using Single Molecule, Real-Time Sequencing, which will expand the known range of human genomic and non-genomic variation. The results should offer the first detailed, long-term reconstruction of the evolutionary history of human adaptability to specific environmental and cultural stressors. Importantly, the translation of the results to biomedical research will shed new light on the origins of modern diseases.

Dr Christopher McDevitt

This project aims to provide new insight into how metal ion uptake is regulated. It will precisely measure the cellular concentrations of metal ions, reveal the roles of metal ions in essential cellular processes, and identify the molecular targets of metal toxicity. Metal ions are essential to all forms of life and are used by up to half of all proteins to facilitate cellular chemical processes. The intended outcome of the research is to provide new fundamental knowledge of the roles of metal ions in bacterial cells; knowledge that will be key to defining the chemical biology of living systems and will provide information essential to understanding how microbes adapt to changing environments.

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