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Analysis of Curriculum Implementation in Teaching Pedagogy at Primary School Level in Pakistan: Research Seminar 26 March 2018

MARCH SCHOOL OF EDUCATION RESEARCH SEMINAR

ALL WELCOME
11:00AM-11:30PM 26 MARCH 2018
LEVEL 8, NEXUS BUILDING, 10 PULTENEY STREET, SMaRTe ROOM 812, SCHOOL OF EDUACATION

ANALYSIS OF CURRICULUM IMPLEMENTATION IN TEACHING PEDAGOGY AT PRIMARY SCHOOL LEVEL IN PAKISTAN

IMTIAZ ALI BUGHIO: PhD Candidate, School of Education, University of Adelaide

ABSTRACT:
English, an official language of Pakistan, is the language of power (Mahboob, 2002; Mansoor, 2004; Rahman, 1999). The ruling elite of Pakistan, such as the military and bureaucracy, is proficient in English because of their education and training in English medium institutions (Mansoor, 2004). In addition, a good command over English ensures employment in various high paying government and private jobs in Pakistan (Mansoor, 2004, Rahman, 2005). The English language curriculum for schools in Pakistan was established by the government, but teachers are not necessarily aware of its contents.

English is a compulsory subject from grade 1 onwards in government schools. The duration of English classes in these schools ranges between 30 and 35 minutes every day with no exposure to the English language outside the class (Shamim, 2011). In addition to the low functional value of the English language, lack of resources for language learning and resistance from speakers of other languages to the teaching of English are factors contributing to the poor English language skills of students in government-owned schools (Faraz, 2010).

This presentation is based upon findings from semi-structured interviews with teachers (n=6) and textbook writers (n=3) regarding the implementation of the 2006 National Curriculum for English Language at primary schools in Sindh, a province of Pakistan.

The findings suggest that teachers must be thoroughly trained in using English fluently and accurately, and in implementing the English curriculum using appropriate teaching methods/techniques. In addition, their feedback on required English textbooks and the English teaching curriculum should also be sought and valued for revising, updating or re-writing the English curriculum and textbooks in Pakistan.

BIOGRAPHY:
Imtiaz Ali Bughio is a research scholar at the University of Adelaide, School of Education. He has previously completed a Master in Education and Master of Arts in English from the University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan. In the Summer School and Winter School at the University of Adelaide in 2017, Imtiaz worked as a tutor for the Academic English course. In this course, he helped domestic and international students to develop their skills in the genre of academic writing; prepare for essay writing and oral presentation; develop research skills; use referencing, quoting and paraphrasing accurately; and avoid plagiarism. Imtiaz is registered as a teacher with the Department of Education and Child Development, South Australia, and he also works as a volunteer tutor at the State Library of South Australia.

Imtiaz has been working in the education sector for 15 year. He has worked as an English language teacher, teacher-educator and reviewer of the 2006 Curriculum for English language and English textbooks in Pakistan. With a total dedication for education, Imtiaz is passionate about teaching and making some positive difference in the academic life of students. His research interests include English language teaching, continuous professional development of teachers, curriculum and textbooks for English as an additional/foreign language and English for Academic Purposes.

REFERENCES:
Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison, K. (2013).
Research methods in education: Routledge.
Bughio, F. A.
(2013). Improving English language teaching in large classes at university level in Pakistan (Doctoral dissertation, University of Sussex).
Mahboob, A.
(2002). No English, no future: Language policy in Pakistan. Political independence with linguistic servitude: The Politics about languages in the developing world.
Mansoor, S.
(2004). The status and role of regional languages in higher education in Pakistan. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 25(4), 333-353.
Rahman, T.
(1999). Language, Education and Culture Karachi: Oxford University Press.
Rahman, T.
(2005). Reasons for rage: Reflections on the education system of Pakistan with special reference to English. Education reform in Pakistan: Building for the future, 87-106.
Shamim, F.
(2011). English as the language for development in Pakistan: Issues, challenges and possible solutions. Dreams and realities: Developing countries and the English language, 291-310.
Spencer, L., Ritchie, J., Lewis, J., & Dillon, L.
(2003). Quality in qualitative evaluation: a framework for assessing research evidence.

To contact Imtiaz Ali Bughio: Click Here

 

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