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Sinead Golley

For the Food Values Research Group’s September seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Sinead Golley:

Food avoidance: why are so many of us going gluten free?

Dr Sinead Golley, CSIRO Health & Biosecurity

Research conducted by the CSIRO has revealed a significant trend amongst Australian adults to engage in self-prescribed dietary modification through the avoidance of key dietary factors. With one-in-five Australians actively avoiding consuming products containing wheat and/or dairy this body of research provides key insights into the drivers of the market for ‘gluten- or dairy-free’ consumer products or dining experiences.

Data presented relating to the avoidance of wheat and dairy products in relation to prevalence, drivers and influences were obtained through a random sample of the Australian population (N = 1184). One in ten adults surveyed reported avoiding wheat foods, 16% dairy foods. While a proportion of avoiders were restricting consumption for reasons such as personal taste, preference or body weight-related factors the vast majority, equalling 15% of Australians, reported avoiding these foods for control of adverse reactions, primarily gastrointestinal in nature.

With important implications for public health this dietary trend is seldom accompanied by a formal diagnosis, or expert dietary supervision, driven substantially by information obtained from complementary medicine or lay sources, such as family, friends or the media. Of concern are the risks inherent in the self-prescribed nature of this behaviour including potential nutritional imbalances and the delay in identification and treatment of potentially serious underlying medical conditions.

Dr Sinead Golley is a behavioural scientist who joined the CSIRO in May 2009. Her particular expertise lies in the areas of social-cognitive and applied health psychology, with specialised understanding of the relationship between implicit cognitive processes, in particular the use of heuristic knowledge structures, and subsequent biases in attitudes, attributions and decision making. Her current research topics include the understanding the drivers of food choice, in particular food avoidance, acceptance of novel technologies in relation to food, and also individual differences with relevance to health attitudes and their impact on (multiple) health behaviours.

When: Wednesday 5th of September, 12-1 PM
Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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Professor Eva Kemps

For the Food Values Research Group’s August seminar, we are pleased to welcome Professor Eva Kemps:

Chocolate, chips, and pizza: It’s just so hard to say ‘no’

Dr Eva Kemps, Professor of Psychology, Flinders University

Most people know the importance of eating a healthy balanced diet, yet many find it difficult to do so. One major contributing factor is an abundance of foods high in fat, salt and/or sugar in the environment. This poses a conflict between eating healthily and indulging in unhealthy temptations. An imbalance in favour of the latter can lead to poor eating habits as well as overeating, thereby contributing to rising obesity rates. Contrary to popular belief, resisting appetising food is not simply a matter of will-power. There are subtle yet powerful psychological influences that can affect what people eat and how much they eat. This seminar will explain how and why people can easily fall prey to these influences. It will also look at some recent strategies developed in our lab in an endeavour to counter these influences to help curb unwanted (over)eating of unhealthy food.

Heart shape made of junk foodDr Eva Kemps is a Professor of Psychology in the College of Education, Psychology and Social Work at Flinders University. Her research focuses on the cognitive psychology of eating behaviour.

When: Wednesday 1st of August, 12-1 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

 

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basket of vegetablesIn the modern dietary landscape, it’s sometimes difficult to keep up with the dizzying array of celebrity chefs, Instagram famous wellness gurus, and new “clean eating” trends popping up almost weekly. These dietary prescriptions often come with sweeping promises of outrageous cures for everything from autism and asthma, to cancer and depression, a pathway to true wellness of body, mind, and spirit.

But what effects do this language of dietary virtue and the preoccupation with “clean” eating have on how we think about and relate to food? How do these dietary trends fit into the current cultural landscape? And what should we think about the culture that surrounds the wellness industry? 

Professor Rachel Ankeny from the Food Values Research Group here at the University of Adelaide and Dr Christopher Mayes, Research Fellow at Deakin University, join the ABC’s Hilary Harper on Blueprint for Living, to talk about clean eating and the quest for purity.

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A few weeks ago, Emily Buddle, a PhD candidate here at University of Adelaide with the Food Values Research Group, met with a group of dairy farmers and managers from Western Victoria across to the Fleurieu Peninsula who are part of “TRACtion”. These farmers are a group who are passionate and work hard towards continuous improvement […]

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The Food Values Research Group has been fortunate this year to have been joined by some excellent speakers on a range of interesting and varied topics. A few weeks ago, Anthropologist Dr Georgina Drew came to explain and discuss the ways that villagers in India used Gandhian-inspired repertoires of resistance to frame water rights within […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s June seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Georgina Drew. “In the Land of Milk and Yogurt, We Don’t Want Coca-Cola”: Gandhi-Inspired Moral Ecologies of Rural Development in India Dr Georgina Drew, Anthropology and Development Studies, School of Social Sciences, University of Adelaide The Coca-Cola insignia is omnipresent in contemporary India but […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s May seminar, we are pleased to welcome Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson. Throw another cricket on the barbie? Australian consumers’ awareness and acceptance of insects as food Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Faculty of Sciences, University of Adelaide Insects have long been consumed as part of the […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s April seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Michelle Phillipov. A ‘Labour of Love’: The politics and pleasures of niche food production Dr Michelle Phillipov, School of Humanities, University of Adelaide Popular food media encourages us to “connect” with the sources—and producers—of our food in order to resist the alienation and […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s second seminar of 2018, we are pleased to welcome our own Emily Buddle! Australian Meat Consumers’ Understandings of Farm Animal Welfare Ms Emily Buddle, PhD Candidate, Food Values Research Group, School of Humanities, University of Adelaide In developed Western societies, raising animals for meat has come under significant public scrutiny in […]

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The Food Values Research Group is excited to host UK authors and cheese scholars Bronwen and Francis Percival for a special seminar on Monday, 19 March 2018. All welcome! Reinventing the Wheel: Starter Cultures and the Making of Modern Cheese Bronwen Percival, Cheese Buyer for Neal’s Yard Dairy, London, and Francis Percival, writer for The World of Fine […]

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