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Rural Indian child protesting Coca-Cola bottling plant

The Food Values Research Group has been fortunate this year to have been joined by some excellent speakers on a range of interesting and varied topics.

A few weeks ago, Anthropologist Dr Georgina Drew came to explain and discuss the ways that villagers in India used Gandhian-inspired repertoires of resistance to frame water rights within a moral economy of rural development, as communities successfully fought the development a Coca-Cola bottling plant near agricultural lands.

Kerry Wilkinson introduces us to some insect food productsEarlier, back in May, we were lucky enough to have Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson come and introduce us to the world of entomophagy (eating insects). She talked about the nutritional, environmental and economic benefits that edible insects provide, and presented her research on consumer attitudes toward eating insect products.

A surprisingly large portion of the Australian population have neutral or favourable attitudes towards eating insects, though the type of insect and the form of the product make a considerable difference! Kerry discussed how producers attempting to promote insect consumption can overcome attitudinal barriers that currently present a challenge for the industry. Finally, we also got to try some examples of some of these tasty insect snacks!

There will be no seminar event on in July while Rachel is away. However, put our August 1st event in your diary – Associate Professor Eva Kemps from Flinders University is coming to speak to us on a topic that I’m sure most of us can relate to: Chocolate, chips, and pizza: It’s just so hard to say ‘no’Further information will be available closer to the event, and in the meantime the upcoming event schedule can be found here.

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For the Food Values Research Group’s June seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Georgina Drew.

“In the Land of Milk and Yogurt, We Don’t Want Coca-Cola”: Gandhi-Inspired Moral Ecologies of Rural Development in India

Dr Georgina Drew, Anthropology and Development Studies, School of Social Sciences, University of Adelaide

The Coca-Cola insignia is omnipresent in contemporary India but so, too, are discourses critiquing the multinational company’s land and water use practices. This talk highlights the knowledge production and cognitive practices of rural Indians who successfully opposed a Coca-Cola bottling plant near agricultural lands during a decadal fight. Their claim that “In a land of milk and yogurt we don’t want Coca Cola” offers a condemnation to the land contamination and water theft that the company has allegedly caused while leading to an erosion of village products derived from milk and fruit. Of conceptual concern are the movement’s efforts to use Gandhian-inspired repertoires of resistance that frame rural water rights within a moral economy of rural development. The evidence offered to support this assertion includes the strategic use of semiotics and the careful deployment of discourses—such as slogans and protest songs—that produce knowledge about villagers’ rights to rural subsistence and survival.

 

Dr Georgina Drew is a senior lecturer in the Department of Anthropology and Development Studies at the University of Adelaide. Her work explores the cultural and religious politics of resource management, and the challenges of inclusive and culturally sensitive resource use She is the author of the book River Dialogues: Hindu Faith and the Political Ecology of Dams on the Sacred Ganga (University of Arizona Press, 2017).

When: Wednesday 6th of June, 12-1 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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For the Food Values Research Group’s May seminar, we are pleased to welcome Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson.

Throw another cricket on the barbie? Australian consumers’ awareness and acceptance of insects as food

Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Faculty of Sciences, University of Adelaide

Insects have long been consumed as part of the diets of many Asian, African and South American cultures. In Australia, the Indigenous ‘bush tucker’ diet comprising witchetty grubs, honey ants and Bogong moths is quite well known, but consumption of insects by Australians tends to occur only as a novelty. Despite international agencies such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations advocating the nutritional, environmental and economic benefits of entomophagy, attitudinal barriers persist in Western societies, which presents a challenge to producers attempting to promote consumption of insects. This seminar will present results from a study investigating Australian consumers’ awareness and acceptance of insects as food. The sensory appeal of different insects (e.g. crickets, mealworms, ants and cockroaches), and products containing insect-based ingredients will be discussed, together with factors that were found to influence our willingness to try eating insects. And yes, we’ll provide snacks!

Kerry is an Associate Professor of Oenology at The University of Adelaide. Her primary research interests concern the flavour chemistry of grapes and wine, for example: the impact of bushfire smoke on grapes and wine; the improved utility of oak wood for wine maturation; and the influence of production method on the composition and sensory profiles of sparkling wine. Other areas of interest include the chemical and sensory analysis of foods and beverages, and their appeal to consumers.

When: Wednesday 2nd of May, 12-1 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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For the Food Values Research Group’s April seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Michelle Phillipov. A ‘Labour of Love’: The politics and pleasures of niche food production Dr Michelle Phillipov, School of Humanities, University of Adelaide Popular food media encourages us to “connect” with the sources—and producers—of our food in order to resist the alienation and […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s second seminar of 2018, we are pleased to welcome our own Emily Buddle! Australian Meat Consumers’ Understandings of Farm Animal Welfare Ms Emily Buddle, PhD Candidate, Food Values Research Group, School of Humanities, University of Adelaide In developed Western societies, raising animals for meat has come under significant public scrutiny in […]

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The Food Values Research Group is excited to host UK authors and cheese scholars Bronwen and Francis Percival for a special seminar on Monday, 19 March 2018. All welcome! Reinventing the Wheel: Starter Cultures and the Making of Modern Cheese Bronwen Percival, Cheese Buyer for Neal’s Yard Dairy, London, and Francis Percival, writer for The World of Fine […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s first seminar of 2018, we present a joint talk featuring the work of two advanced postgraduate students in Cultural Studies at the University of South Australia. Vegan Food and Eating Vegan in Adelaide Ms Julie Cartlidge and Ms Ellen Scott, PhD Candidates, School of Creative Industries, University of South Australia […]

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The Food Values Research Group are currently seeking participants in a new project which aims to understand why people keep chickens, and document related attitudes to, and associated values with having chickens as part of their lives in urban and peri-urban home settings. The welfare of chickens in commercial egg and meat production has been an increasing concern […]

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In the latest episode of ABC Radio National program “Science Friction”, Dr Heather Bray weighs in on the topic of gene editing using new CRISPR-CAS9 technology for livestock animal welfare. The episode “Making animals happier? Gene editing in the farm yard”, looks at the history of genetic modification and gene editing science and technology, and asks […]

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For our final seminar of 2017, the Food Values Research Group is pleased to present: Understanding the role of self-deception enhancement bias in South Australian consumers’ stated purchase of organic foods Associate Professor Sarah Wheeler, Centre for Global Food and Resources, University of Adelaide Consumers around the world are increasingly worried about food safety and quality, […]

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