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Research Seminar: Tenurial revolution around the Pacific rim in the 19th Century

When: Wednesday, 11 June 2014, 12.00-1.00pm
Where: Room 1.10, Ligertwood Building, The University of Adelaide
Speaker: Professor Richard Boast, Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Law; Distinguished Visiting Research Scholar, Adelaide Law School

 Synopsis: In the mid-19th Century (from roughly 1840-1880) many countries and colonies around the Pacific rim, including New Zealand, Hawaii, Mexico, the Central American states, Chile, and the states and provinces of the US and Canada embarked on massive reforms to their laws relating to land tenure.  Indigenous lands held on customary title were now to be individualised, surveyed, and ‘individualised’ (the term for the same process in the Spanish American republics was ‘desamortizacion’).  Why did these apparently diverse jurisdictions embark on such apparently similar ‘reforms’ at more or less the same time? What were the practical effects, and how do the Australian colonies fit with this wider picture?

Speaker: Professor Richard Boast, Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Law, Wellington, New Zealand; Professor Boast is currently Distinguished Visiting Research Scholar, Adelaide Law School, funded by the Faculty of the Professions Aim for the Stars Research Program.

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