BLOGS WEBSITE

AIHW report released on the health of Australia’s males

A report on “The health of Australia’s males: 25 years and over” was released by the Australian Insitute of Health and Welfare this month.

On a good note, the report indicates that males are living longer. Between 2001 and 2011, there was a gain of 1.9 years in life expectancy for males aged 65 and 0.6 years for males aged 85 and males, can on average expect to live to 80 years or over.  Also, in 2007-08, 47% of males aged 65 and over had discussed a healthy lifestyle with a health professional.

But the report also confirms that Men’s Health research, education and services must remain a top priority to improve the health and well-being of Australian men.  Some key findings for males aged 25 years or greater include:

  • Coronary heart disease and lung cancer were the leading causes of death in males in 2010.
  • 1 in 4 (25%) deaths among males aged 25-29 was attributed to suicide. 24% (30-34) and 21% (35-39).
  • The proportion of males aged 25 and over who were overweight or obese increased from 69% to 75% between 1995 and 2011-12, and was highest among males aged 45-54.
  • 66% of males had a waist circumference that put them at increased risk of chronic disease.
  • The 5-year relative survival rate for males with prostate cancer was 92%. There were more than 3,200 deaths from prostate cancer in 2010.
  • 1 in 10 men aged 50-59 (11%) and 60-69 (10%) are at risk of injury resulting from excessive alcohol consumption on a daily basis.
  • Married males who are employed are less likely to rate their health as fair or poor (11%) than unemployed males (37%) or males not in the labour force (41%).
  • Nearly 1 in 5 men require help or use aids or equipment to assist with mobility, self care or communication.

This report and the report on The health of Australia’s males: from birth to young adulthood (0-24 years) are available for download at http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/

This entry was posted in News, Research and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

Comments are closed.