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Category: Constitutional Law

PLPRU hosts Uluru Statement event

On 21 March 2018, more than 200 people came to PLPRU’s event, ‘Understanding the Uluru Statement from the Heart’. After a Welcome to Country from Uncle Lewis O’Brien AO and an introduction from PLPRU Director Alex Reilly, we heard from Tony McAvoy SC, Josie Crawshaw, Dwayne Coulthard, who explained the voice, treaty and truth aspects […]

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Uluru Statement event: Voice, Treaty, and Truth

The Public Law and Policy Research Unit invites you to a public lecture to explain the reform proposals in the Uluru Statement. The proposals were the product of extensive dialogues within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities around the nation, and were presented to the Government in October 2017. The speakers for this event are: […]

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Bob Brown takes to the High Court to put hardline anti-protest laws to the test

In a landmark case now before the High Court, former Australian Greens leader Bob Brown and fellow forestry protester Jessica Hoyt are arguing that Tasmania’s anti-protest laws unconstitutionally restrict freedom of speech. PLPRU member Associate Professor Peter Burdon, and Associate Professor Mary Heath from Flinders University, have published an article about the case in The […]

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Upcoming Seminar: Jeffrey Goldsworthy on Constitutional Implications

PLPRU, together with the South Australian Chapter of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law are pleased to present Professor Jeffrey Goldsworthy speaking on The Implicit and the Implied in a Written Constitution. Jeff Goldsworthy (Monash University) is currently a visiting scholar at Adelaide Law School. He is among Australia’s leading constitutional scholars and legal philosophers. His work is […]

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The Critical Judgments Project: Re-reading Monis v The Queen

Three PLPRU members, Peter Burdon, Alex Reilly and Anna Olijnyk, have contributed to a new book to be published by Federation Press later this month. Federation Press describe The Critical Judgments Project: Re-reading Monis v The Queen (Gabrielle Appleby and Rosalind Dixon, eds): ‘This book introduces students to a number of critical legal perspectives and demonstrates how […]

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Sharing Water from Transboundary Rivers: Limits on State Power

In an article published in issue 44(1) of the Federal Law Review, Dr Adam Webster examines the the issue of whether states have a ‘right’ to a share in the water of rivers that flow through more than one state. The following is the abstract of the article: Disputes between States of Australia over the […]

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Executive Power under the Constitution: A Presidential and Parliamentary System Compared

In an article published in the University of Colorado Law Review, Dr Adam Webster (with Associate Professor Gabrielle Appleby, UNSW Law) compares the two systems of executive government under the US presidential system and the Australian parliamentary system. This article was presented at the 23rd Annual Ira C. Rothgerber Jr. Conference on Constitutional Law at […]

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Explainer: what is a ‘hung parliament’, and how will a government be formed?

In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Adam Webster explains what is a ‘hung parliament’, and how will a government be formed? Click here to read Adam’s article.

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Election explainer: what does it mean that we’re having a double-dissolution election?

Malcolm Turnbull has made the journey to Government House at Yarralumla to ask the governor-general to dissolve both houses of parliament and hold a double-dissolution election. So, what is a double-dissolution election? How does it differ from an ordinary election? And why the rush after the budget? In an article published on The Conversation, Adam […]

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Upcoming Event: Encounters with the Constitution over 45 years in the Law

The South Australian Chapter of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law, in conjunction with the University of Adelaide’s Public Law and Policy Research Unit, are pleased to present: The Honourable Tom Gray QC speaking on Encounters with the Constitution over 45 years in the Law Recently retired after 16 years as a judge of the Supreme […]

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