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TAG: Attorney-General

The Attorney and his Advisers: A Cautionary Tale

Queensland’s Solicitor-General has resigned and now taken aim at the conduct of his Attorney-General. In this post, Dr Gabrielle Appleby considers the longer-term consequences of the Attorney-General’s actions over the last few weeks. This piece was originally published in The Conversation. Queensland solicitor-general Walter Sofronoff QC resigned last week. He has now revealed his outrage […]

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Book Release: Public Sentinels (Ashgate Publishing, 2014)

In February 2014 Public Sentinels: A Comparative Study of Australian Solicitors-General was published by Ashgate Publishing. Public Sentinels is a collection of essays compiled and edited by Dr Gabrielle Appleby and Professor John Williams of the University of Adelaide Law School and Professor Patrick Keyzer of Bond University. Public Sentinels brings together scholarship about top […]

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When did government accountability stop making sense?

Today, government accountability is generally accepted as a desirable goal. There is a public expectation that governments and their agencies will be able to be brought to account in a variety of ways – whether that be through traditional mechanisms such as parliamentary oversight, or through the growing proliferation of specialist accountability bodies including Ombudsmen, […]

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Government Lawyers and the Public Interest: Still Relevant Today?

  What is the relationship between the public interest and government lawyers? On one level, the concept pervades the very existence of government lawyers: advising and assisting government understand the limits of its powers is a function conducted in the public interest. But beyond providing one explanation for the existence of government lawyers, should the […]

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If the Judiciary shouldn’t, who should advise the Governor-General?

This week, further information was revealed on the role of Sir Anthony Mason in advising the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr, in the events leading up to Prime Minister Gough Whitlam’s dismissal in 1975. The revelations raise renewed interest in the propriety of the Judiciary advising the Governor-General in times of constitutional crisis. Gabrielle Appleby considers […]

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God Save the QC?

The ‘Queens’land Government has announced that it will abandon the post-nominal ‘SC’ (Senior Counsel) for the State’s most senior barristers and return to ‘the Queen’s Counsel regime’ (see here).  In South Australia, the appointment of Queen’s Counsel has not been without controversy. Adam Webster reflects upon some of the controversies surrounding the appointment of Queen’s […]

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Could we have a Truly FEDERAL High Court?

Associate Professor John Gava takes us again into the debate on High Court appointments. His suggestion? Federalize the High Court! John argues that such a move would have an important symbolic effect, and potentionally practical effects that may manifest in the High Court’s reasoning. His comments are particularly timely as the Commonwealth Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon, […]

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Upcoming High Court Appointments: Looking Outside the Square with Professor John Williams

Yesterday on the ABC’s The World Today, Professor John Williams, Dean of the Law School, discussed ‘looking outisde the square’ when it came to the High Court appointments. The Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon, must make recommendations on the appointment of two judges to replacing the retiring Justice Gummow (who retires this year), and Justice Heydon (who retires next year). […]

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