In an article posted on The Conversation, Dr Anna Olijnyk explains the claims of ‘apprehended bias’ made against Royal Commissioner Dyson Heydon. Click here to read Anna’s article.

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In an article published on New Matilda, Dr Adam Webster examines whether a plebiscite or referendum are really necessary to legislate on marriage equality. Click here to read Adam’s article.

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In the forthcoming edition of the Melbourne University Law Review (vol 39(1)), Dr Adam Webster examines the argument that the common law could provide a solution to interstate river disputes. The following is the abstract of the article: In Australia, the sharing of water from a river — such as the Murray River — that flows […]

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Earlier this month the PLPRU, in conjunction with the Adelaide Law School, hosted a professional development day for high school Legal Studies teachers. Twenty teachers from private and public schools across South Australia attended the workshop. This is the second year the Adelaide Law School has organised this event and it is hoped the School […]

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On the AUSPUBLAW blog Dr Peter Burdon and Associate Professor Alex Reilly argue that revoking citizenship for engaging in terrorist activities weakens Australian citizenship for no positive gain. Click here to read their post.

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This post was first published on AUSPUBLAW, the Australian Public Law Blog. AUSPUBLAW is a recently launched national platform for academics, practitioners and others from across Australia to communicate their research and provide expert commentary on topical public law issues. Visit the blog to learn more: www.auspublaw.org BY JUDITH BANNISTER Freedom of information (FOI) reform […]

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Dr Anna Olijnyk, committee member of the Australian Institute of Administrative Law (SA Chapter) invites you to attend the following event: The Ombudsman’s new role under the Return to Work Act Presenter: Wayne Lines, South Australian Ombudsman Wayne Lines was appointed as the South Australian Ombudsman effective from 18 December 2014. Mr Lines is just […]

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In an article published in The Advertiser, Kellie Toole explains why the ‘gay panic’ defence of provocation should be abolished. Click here to read Kellie’s article.

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In an article published on The Conversation today, Dr Adam Webster, explains the proposed changes to the Marriage Act 1961 (Cth) to provide marriage equality in Australia and the differences between the three bills before the Commonwealth Parliament. Click here to read Adam’s article.

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In an article published in The Australian today, Dr Joanna Howe explains that while the government is to be commended for its establishment of a special taskforce to address fraud in the working holiday visa program, its target should be labour hire contractors, not working holiday-makers. Click here to read Joanna’s article.

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