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Monthly Archives: May 2013

Government makes a joke of public consultation and popular sovereignty

On 14 September, Australians will be asked to vote on a change to the Constitution that will allow the Commonwealth government to provide funding directly to local governments, by-passing the States. The proposal has been largely swept under the carpet by the government, who don’t want to talk to the Australian people about it. Adelaide […]

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Is the 457 visa scheme working well?

The Senate Legal and Constiutional Affairs Committee is conducting an inquiry into the framework and operation of subclass 457 visas, Enterprise Migration Agreements and Regional Migration Agreements. Adelaide Law School’s Dr Joanna Howe, Associate Professor Alexander Reilly and Professor Andrew Stewart made a submission to the inquiry, and on Thursday, 23 May, Dr Joanna Howe […]

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Panic About the ‘Gay Panic’ Defence – SA Reform to Provocation Proposed

This month, the Greens introduced a Bill into the South Australian Parliament to prohibit the use of the ‘gay panic’ defence in the State. In this post, Adelaide Law School’s Kellie Toole considers the value of the amendment.  Picture this: Peter is in a bar enjoying a few drinks. Sally has been watching him from across […]

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Symposium: Compulsory Voting in Comparative Perspective

The Adelaide Law School is delighted to invite you to attend a symposium on compulsory voting in comparative perspective, presented by its postgraduate Comparative Law class. The symposium addresses the question whether people should be compelled to vote in a democratic system of government. The Australian electoral system is considered by electoral specialists to be […]

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Compulsory Voting and the Constitution

In the last few years, the High Court has constitionalized a number of aspects of our electoral system and franchise. In this post, Associate Professor John Gava looks at the implications this may have for compulsory voting. Let’s conduct a thought experiment. Imagine the Commonwealth Parliament passing a law that takes away the right of […]

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AACL and AIAL joint seminars on the “Street Preachers Case”

In February 2013 the High Court handed down its decision in                           Attorney-General (SA) v Corporation of the City of Adelaide (the Street Preachers Case). The AACL and the AIAL are jointly presenting two seminars to explore the administrative and constitutional issues emerging from the decision.   Seminar 1:  The Scope of Council By-Law Making Powers […]

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