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maca root and powder

Recent research by Adelaide food Values Research Group’s Dr Jessica Loyer and University of Edinbugh’s Dr Christine Knight looks at the role of “nutritional primitivism” in selling “superfoods” such as Andean maca.

In their article, published in Food, Culture, and Society, they investigate roles of nutritional primitivism both as a marketing tool and as a popular social-environmental critique of current health problems and globalised and industrialised agri-food systems. They adopt a critical perspective, exploring the insights and limitations of this sort of approach.

You can read more about their research here.

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Paula Zito

For the Food Values Research Group’s October seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Paula Zito.

Dr Paula Caroline Zito, Associate Teacher, Adelaide Law School, The University of Adelaide

Regional branding of food products and food Geographical Indications

This presentation analyses the current laws and regulations in Australia that regulate the usage of Australian regional names on food products to make origin claims. It identifies their deficiencies, and problems resulting from them, for Australian regional food producers and the wider Australian food and agrifood industries. It analyses the current regulation of Australian regional names on wine labels in order to highlight the vast differences that exist, under current Australian laws, in the regulation of how regional names are used on food labels to make origin claims, compared to how regional names are used on wine labels, in the form of Geographical Indications, to make origin claims.

The presentation proposes that there is a strong case for the implementation of a sui generis food Geographical Indication framework in Australia in order to overcome the deficiencies identified with current Australian laws and regulations. The presentation explains that the proposal for an Australian sui generis food Geographical Indication framework is not only important at a national level, but also equally important at an international level, especially in the context of the recently commenced negotiations with the European Union in relation to the Australia-European Union Free Trade Agreement. 

Paula qualified for the award of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy for her thesis entitled “Geographical Indications: What is their Worth? A Comparison of Geographical Indication Registrations Between Australia and Italy,” on 21 February 2018. She graduated at The University of Adelaide on 3 May 2018. Her supervisors were Professor Melissa de Zwart and Associate Professor Bernadette Richards.

Her thesis explores the worth of using food Geographical Indications on food products to make an origin claim in the context of a sui generis food Geographical Indication system. It assesses the value of using a sui generis food Geographical Indication system to protect the connection between Australian regional food and origin and to protect the assets that Australia has in Australia regional names as identifiers of authentic regional food products that have a clear and strong connection with Australian regions. This assessment is made against a background of significant and original fieldwork carried out in Italy and South Australia.

When: Wednesday 7th of November, 12-1 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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Child eating chips watching television

For the Food Values Research Group’s October seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Lisa Smithers.

Food Advertising to Children

Dr Lisa Smithers, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, University of Adelaide

For many years it has been thought that the advertising of food influences what children eat. In 2012, we systematically reviewed the literature to estimate Australian children’s exposure to food advertising on television. We found only four studies of limited quality, and these studies had widely varying estimates of exposure. We then undertook one of the largest studies ever conducted on food advertising on television. Throughout 2016 we logged 30,000 hours of television and coded >800,000 advertisements. Our data shows that 11% of all advertising was for foods and beverages, with snack foods, crumbed meats, fast foods and sweetened beverages advertised the most. We estimated children’s exposure to food advertising at times when many children watch television and when C-rated programs are broadcast. Our large database of advertisements is now allowing us to extend the scope of our work to advertising of specific food products and advertising of food and alcohol during sports events.

Dr Lisa Smithers has research interests in paediatric public health and nutrition, perinatal epidemiology, and Aboriginal health. Her work on food advertising to children can be found here.

When: Wednesday 3rd of October, 12-1 PM

Where: Ira Raymond Room, Barr Smith Library, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide (click here for campus map)

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Heather and Emily

Over the last week, members of the Food Values Research Group (FVRG) have been presenting their research and participating in panel discussions at the 2018 4S Conference held at the International Convention Centre in Sydney. The theme for this year’s 4S (Society for the Social Studies of Science) conference was “TRANSnational Society and Technology Studies […]

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Sinead Golley

For the Food Values Research Group’s September seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Sinead Golley: Food avoidance: why are so many of us going gluten free? Dr Sinead Golley, CSIRO Health & Biosecurity Research conducted by the CSIRO has revealed a significant trend amongst Australian adults to engage in self-prescribed dietary modification through the avoidance of […]

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Professor Eva Kemps

For the Food Values Research Group’s August seminar, we are pleased to welcome Professor Eva Kemps: Chocolate, chips, and pizza: It’s just so hard to say ‘no’ Dr Eva Kemps, Professor of Psychology, Flinders University Most people know the importance of eating a healthy balanced diet, yet many find it difficult to do so. One major contributing […]

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    In the modern dietary landscape, it’s sometimes difficult to keep up with the dizzying array of celebrity chefs, Instagram famous wellness gurus, and new “clean eating” trends popping up almost weekly. These dietary prescriptions often come with sweeping promises of outrageous cures for everything from autism and asthma, to cancer and depression, a […]

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A few weeks ago, Emily Buddle, a PhD candidate here at University of Adelaide with the Food Values Research Group, met with a group of dairy farmers and managers from Western Victoria across to the Fleurieu Peninsula who are part of “TRACtion”. These farmers are a group who are passionate and work hard towards continuous improvement […]

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The Food Values Research Group has been fortunate this year to have been joined by some excellent speakers on a range of interesting and varied topics. A few weeks ago, Anthropologist Dr Georgina Drew came to explain and discuss the ways that villagers in India used Gandhian-inspired repertoires of resistance to frame water rights within […]

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For the Food Values Research Group’s June seminar, we are pleased to welcome Dr Georgina Drew. “In the Land of Milk and Yogurt, We Don’t Want Coca-Cola”: Gandhi-Inspired Moral Ecologies of Rural Development in India Dr Georgina Drew, Anthropology and Development Studies, School of Social Sciences, University of Adelaide The Coca-Cola insignia is omnipresent in contemporary India but […]

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