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The real issues with 457 visas

In an article published on The Conversation today, PLPRU’s Joanna Howe explains the problems with Australia’s system of ‘457 visas’, arguing that the reality is not reflected in the political debate.

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Election explainer: what does it mean that we’re having a double-dissolution election?

Malcolm Turnbull has made the journey to Government House at Yarralumla to ask the governor-general to dissolve both houses of parliament and hold a double-dissolution election. So, what is a double-dissolution election? How does it differ from an ordinary election? And why the rush after the budget? In an article published on The Conversation, Adam […]

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Explainer: what are double-dissolution elections? And why might we soon have one?

In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Adam Webster, explains the difference between a double-dissolution election and an ‘ordinary’ election. Click here to read Adam’s article.

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$3 an hour: how the Australian government exploits foreign workers

In an article published in The Age, Dr Joanna Howe argues that a visa that allows international companies to employ foreign crews for $3 an hour will decimate the Australian shipping industry. “With our car plants closing down and manufacturing jobs going offshore, we are increasingly accustomed to jobs being lost overseas. What is new […]

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Getting bike laws right means balancing rights of cyclists and motorists

In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Adam Webster (with Gabrielle Appleby of UNSW) explains how cycling law reform must balance the rights of cyclists with the rights of other road users. Click here to read Adam’s article.  

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Would A Plebiscite On Marriage Equality Do Anything?

In an article published on New Matilda, Dr Adam Webster examines whether a plebiscite or referendum are really necessary to legislate on marriage equality. Click here to read Adam’s article.

Posted in Constitutional Law, Research and commentary | Tagged , , |

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Turn Spotlight on Labour Hire Contractors

In an article published in The Australian today, Dr Joanna Howe explains that while the government is to be commended for its establishment of a special taskforce to address fraud in the working holiday visa program, its target should be labour hire contractors, not working holiday-makers. Click here to read Joanna’s article.

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Is a Constitutional principle making States too cautious with law and order policies?

In a post on the Power to Persuade blog, Dr Anna Olijnyk and Associate Professor Gabrielle Appleby (UNSW) explain their research project on the effect of uncertain constitutional principle on State law and order policy. Click here to read Anna’s post.

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Government inquiry takes aim at green charities that ‘get political’

In an article published on The Conversation, Dr Peter Burdon examines the Federal Government inquiry into tax-deductibility status of environmental groups. Click here to read Peter’s article.

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Workers, Small Business and Taxpayers Disadvantaged by Workers’ Compensation Plan, New Research Warns

Research by Adelaide Law School’s Dr Joanna Howe has recommended that the Federal Parliament reject legislation reforming Australia’s workers’ compensation system, warning that the current bill fails the public interest test and risks adversely impacting on workers, small and medium sized businesses, and taxpayers. The McKell Institute report, “Unsafe and Unfair: A Critique of the […]

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