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TAG: South Australia

Fair Crack of the Whip

Professor John Williams (Adelaide Law School) and Professor Clement MacIntyre (School of History and Politics) consider the wisdom of the ‘fairness’ provision in the South Australian electoral system. On 9 February 1991 nearly 77 percent of the South Australian electors voted in favour of an amendment to constitutionalise a ‘fairness’ provision in the electoral system. […]

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Upcoming Event – White Man’s Law on Aboriginal Land: The Conflict of Legal Cultures on the South Australian and Prairie Canadian Frontiers

The Adelaide Law School is proud to host: White Man’s Law on Aboriginal Land: The Conflict of Legal Cultures on the South Australian and Prairie Canadian Frontiers   Presented by: Professor Louis Knafla   Dr Louis A Knafla is Professor Emeritus of History, University of Calgary, and specializes in early modern English and western Canadian […]

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Constitutional Recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: Some Important Steps

Dr Matthew Stubbs considers the important steps that were taken last week towards constitutional recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples at the Commonwealth and State level. The political spectacle of the final parliamentary sitting weeks of the year in both Canberra and Adelaide has tended to obscure coverage of some important steps that […]

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River Murray agreement to waterproof SA may turn out to be a castle built on sand

Professor John Williams, Dean of the Adelaide Law School, has long been a campaigner for the rights of South Australia to water from the River Murray. Today, he wrote an opinion piece in The Advertiser analysing the recent agreement between the Commonwealth and South Australia to provide an additional 450GL to promote the health of […]

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Supporting Recognition of Indigenous Peoples in the South Australian Constitution

In May this year, South Australian Premier Jay Weatherill announced that his government was committed to formal recognition of the State’s Aboriginal peoples through amendment of the Constitution Act 1934 (SA). The government established an advisory panel to consult with the South Australian community, advise the government on the preferred form of the amendment and […]

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Can the High Court Save the Murray River?

John Williams and Adam Webster examine the question that all South Australians would like answered – can the High Court save the Murray River? On 28 May 2012, Premier Jay Weatherill described the Murray Darling Basin Authority’s Revised Basin Plan as ‘unacceptable’ and argued that ‘it does not return enough water to provide for a […]

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South Australia finally moves to establish an Independent Commissioner Against Corruption

Earlier this month (May 2012), the South Australian Weatherill Labor Government introduced a Bill to establish an Independent Commissioner Against Corruption. This is a move that had been opposed by the Rann Government for years. Gabrielle Appleby explores the change in policy, before looking to the Bill itself. She focuses on the extent to which […]

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The River Murray Dispute

The River Murray Dispute is one that has defined the Australian federation since its inception, although its nature has changed as the River’s use for navigation and trade has receded and its importance as a water source for irrigation and drinking has increased. Nowhere is the dispute felt more strongly than in the downstream State […]

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Could we have a Truly FEDERAL High Court?

Associate Professor John Gava takes us again into the debate on High Court appointments. His suggestion? Federalize the High Court! John argues that such a move would have an important symbolic effect, and potentionally practical effects that may manifest in the High Court’s reasoning. His comments are particularly timely as the Commonwealth Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon, […]

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Upcoming High Court Appointments: Looking Outside the Square with Professor John Williams

Yesterday on the ABC’s The World Today, Professor John Williams, Dean of the Law School, discussed ‘looking outisde the square’ when it came to the High Court appointments. The Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon, must make recommendations on the appointment of two judges to replacing the retiring Justice Gummow (who retires this year), and Justice Heydon (who retires next year). […]

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