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Public health risk of the bat souvenir trade

Little is known about the global bat souvenir trade, its extent and impact on bat populations and forest ecosystems, and the potential risks posed to public health with bats known carriers of zoonotic diseases. In a preliminary study, published in Frontiers in Veterinary Science, researchers at the University of Adelaide identified over a 15-day period (May […]

Posted in Environment Institute, Media Release, paper, Publications, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences | Tagged , , , , |

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Are we ignoring cost-effective biodiversity measures?

Environmental DNA (or eDNA) profiling is being used increasingly to analyse a range of substrates and historical samples, apparently even thin air, but what about soil? Join Professor Andy Lowe as he investigates an important and cost-effective method of environmental DNA profiling. Monitoring the state of our environment is the only way we can be […]

Posted in Environment Institute, News, Publications, School of Biological Sciences, Science communication | Tagged , , , , , |

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Unregulated reptile trade in US has major influence on Australians’ desire for illegal reptiles

The transnational smuggling of live animals poses a threat to Australia’s biodiversity, conservation, environmental biosecurity, animal welfare, and human health and wellbeing. In a study published in Conversation Letters, researchers at the University of Adelaide compared the illegal smuggling of live reptiles – including lizards, snakes and turtles – into Australia, to the unregulated pet trade […]

Posted in Centre for Applied Conservation Science, Environment Institute, Media Release, paper, Publications, School of Biological Sciences, threatened species | Tagged , , , , , , |

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Detecting impact of sea level rise in new technique

University of Adelaide scientists have developed a new simple, inexpensive and fast method to analyse sulfur isotopes, which can be used to help investigate chemical changes in environments such as oceans, and freshwater rivers and lakes. Published in Talanta, the research opens up potential for new environmental applications of the method, such as tracing the effect […]

Posted in Climate Change, Environment Institute, Media Release, News, paper, Publications, Remote sensing, School of Biological Sciences, Science communication | Tagged , , , , , , |

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The race to stop illegal trading of Australian lizards

Australian reptiles face serious conservation threats from illegal poaching fuelled by international demand and the exotic pet trade. In a new study in Animal Conservation, researchers from the University of Adelaide and the Monitor Conservation Research Society (Monitor) investigated the extent of illegal trade in a well-known Australian lizard: the shingleback, also known as the bobtail or […]

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Our experts refute River Murray estuary claims

A team of scientists, led by the University of Adelaide’s Associate Professor John Tibby, has confirmed that the lower River Murray was not an estuary in the mid-Holocene period (more than 7000 years ago) – reinforcing scientific evidence likely to influence important river management policy decisions. Their new paper, published in the Nature journal Scientific […]

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International joint research reveals how fish adapt to ocean acidification by modifying gene expression

Human-driven global change is challenging the scientific community to understand how marine species might adapt to predicted environmental conditions in the near-future. The effects of the uptake of anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 by oceans affects propagate across the biological hierarchy, from changes in the building blocks of life at nano-scales to organism, physiology and behaviour through ecosystem […]

Posted in Climate, Climate Change, Marine Biology Program, MBP, paper, Publications, School of Biological Sciences, Science communication | Tagged , , , |

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Mount Lofty Ranges woodland bird monitoring reveals steep decline in numbers

Woodland birds are disappearing from the Mount Lofty Ranges at an alarming rate, University of Adelaide research shows, and scientists say the trend is a sign that the ecosystem is on the verge of collapse. Over the past 20 years, the number of woodland birds at monitoring sites has halved. Member of the Environment Institute, […]

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Reducing artificial light at night may improve health

There is a growing body of evidence that exposure to green space is good for our health but a new study from the University of Adelaide has found that this may equally be due to how much light we are exposed to at night. Spending time in green space can improve depressive symptoms, obesity, and […]

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Freaky ‘frankenprawns’: ancient deep sea monsters called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race

Deep sea animals can be the stuff of nightmares. Many inhabit the ocean’s twilight zone (down to 1,000 metres depth), where sunlight has virtually disappeared, and have adapted their vision to this dark alien world. Evolution gave them large, complex eyes to see in dim light — examples include the Vampire Squid, Sloane’s Viperfish, and various predatory crustaceans. […]

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